Red cabbage is another member of the Brassica family, related to broccoli and cauliflower. It's a red version of cabbage that tends to be smaller in size and predominantly consumed raw or with limited cooking.

It adds crunch and slightly more sweetness to salads and coleslaws, not to mention the vivid colour.

Generally they're available all year round with different varieties available to grow during both winter and summer.

How to prepare

Trim off some of the outer leaves, and wash over with water. Cut the cabbage lengthwise, then remove the inner core with a 'V' shaped cut.  Laying flat, slice into stripes either thick or thin depending on the desired use.

  • Stir fried: 4-5 minutes
  • Microwave: 4-6 minutes
  • Steamed: 3-4 minutes

Tip: thin strips take less time to cook but are also best raw. Red cabbage can loose it's colour if cooked too long, but add a small amount of vinegar to help retain colour.

Buyer's and storage guide

The cabbage should have a dark purple to deep red colour, strong leaves and feel firm. If buying a cut portion, ensure the internal ribbing is creamy white.

Can be kept in a cool place for about three days and in the refrigerator for about a week.  Any cut portions should be covered in cling film or in a sealed container, and used within 3-4 days. 

If you've an abundant amount, it can be sliced and blanched for 3-4 mintues, drain and pat dry into some packaging, and put in the freezer where it will store for about 12 months.

 

Serving

  • Finely sliced and tossed in a salad together with walnuts, orange segments or apple wedges and a light vinegar dressing or combine with some fresh figs and drizzled with some honey
  • Create a fresh salad together with pineapple and raisins
  • Enjoy in a coleslaw with a twist using red cabbage instead - very vibrant colours
  • Slightly stir fried together with some capsicum strips, fresh herbs and cashew nuts
  • Very much traditionally used in making krauts, a form of pickling for long term storage that's used as a condiment with roasted meats